This Saturday, the collection of museums, schools and performance halls that dot Bunker Hill’s Grand Avenue corridor are bringing back their collaborative street festival Grand Ave Arts: All Access.

For photographer and filmmaker Shirin Neshat, feeling disconnected from home has been a thread of her life for decades. Born in Iran in 1957, Neshat first came to the United States in 1975 to study at the University of California, Berkley. Eventually exiled from Iran due to the 1979 Iranian …

Choreographer George Balanchine is one of the most celebrated figures in the ballet world, having created shows that have become staples for numerous companies. His work has been well represented at Downtown’s Music Center, including the Royal Ballet’s July production of Romeo and Juliet. 

Last year Two Bit Circus opened its doors, unveiling its first “micro amusement park” in the Arts District on Mateo Street. The 37,000-square-foot space offers arcade games, high-tech versions of circus attractions and a number of virtual reality systems, as well as “story rooms,” similar to…

One of the biggest recent additions to Downtown this year is the Alamo Drafthouse. The two-story space opened at The Bloc shopping center in August. Along with its 12 theaters, the venue offers its Video Vortex bar and arcade on the lower floor. Aside from first-run blockbusters and independ…

1. Did you grow up wishing that you could take part in Nickelodeon’s slime-spewing game show “Double Dare?” It may be too late for you, but the kids still have a shot when the game show swings by the Microsoft Theater on Friday, Oct. 18 for a live show. Kids can sign up online to be a contes…

In one gallery at the California African American Museum, there is a showcase of one of the biggest fashion trends of the 1990s. In another, a glistening, majestic, horse-like animal is the centerpiece of an exhibit dedicated to the work of a local assemblage legend. Nearby, glistening works…

By the time the mute, pouting monster clown Mr. Happy began his shadow puppet show and started making balloons for frightened guests around a dinner table, it was already clear that Haus of Creep is not the standard art show or theatrical experience.

It’s safe to say that most people don’t put too much thought into their signatures. But if you ask author and USC Annenberg School of Communications professor Josh Kun, there is something deeper behind the scribbles than just a name.