Downtown Los Angeles is celebrated for, among other things, its collection of notable museums with heavyweight shows. Just glance across the community and you’ll see, for instance, The Broad’s lauded Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power 1963-1983 or the Museum of Contemporary Art’…

It doesn’t matter if a writer turns away from his creation or allows it to be censored and have its textual heart and soul ripped from it. It doesn’t matter if those who first brought it to life are long gone, and the work itself lays forgotten beneath layers of ash.

In just six short years, the BET Experience has cemented itself as one of, if not the biggest celebrations of black media culture in Los Angeles.

Kaiju, the “strange beasts” of Japanese cinema, have inspired hit movies, toy lines and media franchises. Now there’s a day-long festival in Downtown Los Angeles to celebrate their legacy. Kaijucon runs 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on Saturday, June 15, at the Japanese American National Museum at 100 N. C…

In 2015, the Los Angeles Philharmonic announced that the acclaimed young composer and theater director Yuval Sharon would join the orchestra for three years as its “artist-collaborator.” Sharon, perhaps best known in los Angeles for creating the car opera Hopscotch with his company The Indus…

DTLA—As time ceaselessly marches, humans rise, find ways to fill the day, rest and do it all again. It’s a cycle that a cynic could call repetitive pointlessness that is relieved only by death.

Climate change may not seem like a natural topic for a dance company, but don’t tell that to Heidi Duckler. The dance festival she is organizing this week, Ebb & Flow: Chinatown, addresses the subject. It takes place at Los Angeles State Historic Park from 1-8:30 p.m. on Saturday, June 1.

DTLA—The caveat for the mega-successful musical Mamma Mia! is simple. If you truly can’t stand ABBA’s infectiously catchy pop hits — not the people who pretend to hate them but then secretly sing along to “Dancing Queen” in the car — then its two-and-a-half hours of toe-tapping hooks and joy…

DTLA—The biggest news at the MOCA Benefit Saturday night didn’t have anything to do with the legions of celebrities and musicians who attended. Instead, it concerned philanthropist Carolyn Clark Powers.

In 1979, philanthropist Marcia Weisman and five other local art collectors announced that they would donate a number of their works to what would become the Museum of Contemporary Art. Thus began a sometimes rollercoaster-like existence for one of the most important cultural facilities in Do…