DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES — Bedraggled Parker Center has been a problem for Downtown Los Angeles stakeholders since even before most of the LAPD left the edifice in 2009 for the $400 million Police Administration Building.

Now, finally, city officials have completed a long-awaited report on what the site in the heart of the Civic Center could become.

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The office of 14th District City Councilman José Huizar this afternoon announced that a draft environmental impact report has been released for what to do with the building bounded by First, Temple, Los Angeles and Judge John Aiso streets. The public will be allowed to comment on the document from Sept. 5 to Oct. 21.

The three options are rehabbing the 1955 structure at 150 N. Los Angeles St.; conducting a partial demolition and rehabilitation, and potentially adding a building; and a complete demolition leading to the construction of a new edifice.

“This Draft EIR is an important step in what should be a thorough and extensive public dialogue on what direction we should take in maximizing the space and scope of the Parker Center building and surrounding area, as well as the potential impacts and benefits for the Civic Center and Little Tokyo,” said Huizar in a prepared statement.

In the first scenario, the 319,000-square-foot edifice would be updated with improvements including seismic retrofitting and expanding the parking garage to provide another 137 spaces. For decades before it closed, some of the 1,800 police officers and department brass who worked there complained about the outdated facilities.

The second option envisions rehabbing some of the building while tearing down the dilapidated Parker Center jail. Adding a new structure would create more than 522,000 square feet of usable space.

The final scenario would raze the building and replace it with either one or two office structures with a total of about 750,000 square feet of space. A building could stand up to 450 feet tall and hold 1,173 parking spaces.

Although most Parker Center workers moved over to the PAB immediately after it opened four years ago, a few dozen stragglers in the Scientific Investigation Division and other units remained while additional facilities were updated.

The draft EIR can be seen at http://eng.lacity.org/techdocs/emg/park_center.htm

Copyright 2013 Los Angeles Downtown News.

regardie@downtownnews.com.